The Bernie 50 State Strategy Series: South Carolina, The Black Vote, And Victory

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TL;DR Sanders needs to campaign heavily and spend hard but he only needs to hit an average of 30-35% in Southern states to win. Also jump below the break to avoid the 2016 facts recap and skip right to 2020.

Its times to talk about one of the most divisive issues from the 2016 election. Bernie Sanders and the black vote. Bernie Sanders received approximately 28% of the black vote in the Democratic primaries. This caused him to fall behind in the Southern states as they voted early in the primary and never recover. Hillary Clinton organized the entire black establishment, with help from Barack Obama who not only endorsed her but frog marched Joe Biden into the Rose Garden, staying by his side the whole way so he wouldn't change his mind, to announce that he wouldn't run. Its highly like that in a 3 candidate race, sorry Martin, Bernie would have ended up with 20-25% of the vote and endorsed Joe Biden for some serious concessions to the progressive agenda.

90% of all black voters vote Democratic, 95% in the case of Barack Obama's historic 2008 victory. That means that a large majority of conservative black voters vote Democratic while a large majority of white conservatives vote Republican. Meanwhile we see a far larger proportion of Hispanic and Latino as well as Asian voters vote Republican. This neatly explains a lot of the variance between the support of black voters for Sanders and Asian and Hispanic voters. For obvious reasons Clinton received something like 95%+ of conservative non-white votes. Sanders for obvious reasons picked up a large percentage of progressive, leftist and liberal non-white votes. They then competed for the votes of liberal and moderate non-white voters. A similar divide occurs among white voters. 90% of conservative white voters and some smaller percentage of moderate white voters vote Republican. As such the white vote was stacked in the favor of Sanders even more than the non-black, non-white vote. Of course this is obvious, boring, doesn't support the centrist corporate narrative and doesn't generate clicks online. And most "neutral" political outlets lean towards the moderate side of the Democratic party. Whether the staff was ordered from on high doesn't matter because their personal prejudices came into play. 538 for instance was on the ball about demographics as far as votes and polls but as usual their attempts to be pundits failed totally. I choose not to name names but most of the people who added to this dynamic are pretty obvious even to a casual observer.


However the point of this post is not to re-litigate the 2016 primaries. Here is a table of delegate/vote share targets in the states I'm counting as Southern. Certain states are excluded as I'm putting them in other categories. In fact this post will briefly discuss the other states that many people might consider part of the South and what category I'm including them in instead and why.

The Core South:

State Delegate Total Bernie Delegate Target 2016 Delegate Total
Georgia 105 35%+ (40) Bernie 29[28.2%] (Hillary 73) 102 Total
South Carolina 54 25%+ (14) Bernie 14[26.0%] (Hillary 39) 53 Total
Louisiana 50 35%+ (17) Bernie 14[23.2%] (Hillary 37) 51 Total
Alabama 52 30%+ (17) Bernie 9[19.2%] (Hillary 44) 53 Total
Mississippi 36 35%+ (14) Bernie 5[16.6%] (Hillary 31) 36 Total

As you can see Bernie will have to significantly improve his totals to meet my delegate targets. You may wonder why South Carolina has the lowest delegate target and share of the vote, pretty much identical to 2016. That is because although unlike Iowa and New Hampshire Bernie can't pretty much ignore South Carolina it is an early state and will be heavily focused on. He will need to finish above 15% there so as not to get shut out of delegates but it would be way harder to push up his vote totals in South Carolina compared to other states. By campaigning in states he barely visited last time and especially focusing on Georgia, Bernie can efficiently contact voters who won't be inundated by negative ads and dealing with an overload of candidates showing up at the door. As I mentioned in a previous post, there is a decent increase in vote share available if you are one of one or two candidates that actually makes contact with most voters. And the other candidates won't be prepared for a large and active volunteer network with actual funding and campaign support behind it.

Now lets move on to the other states people might argue should be classified as in the South. First we'll do Texas and Florida. Delegate rich states that are technically in the South. However they have vastly larger Hispanic/Latino populations and are also much more likely to be swing states.

The Big Swing South:

State Delegate Total Bernie Delegate Target 2016 Delegate Total
Texas 228 40%+ (95) Bernie 75[33.2%] (Hillary 147) 222 Total
Florida 219 40%+ (90) Bernie 73[33.3%] (Hillary 141) 214 Total

Bernie contested these states much more heavily than any of the core Southern states. He did much better here due to his stronger Hispanic/Latino support and because he spent big and had lots of volunteers and he set up early on. Typically I am requiring Bernie to make up far less ground here than in Core Southern states because he started higher. These 2 states are where he has the most room for growth from my delegate targets. Since my targets put him 76 delegates short of a first round majority he'll need that expansion opportunity. Furthermore although there are potentially two strong Texas contenders I do not advise the same path as I did for California. These states vote later, are more friendly to Sanders and are also cheaper, though only in comparison to Florida. On top of that Florida is a certified swing state and Texas is trending strongly blue. The Democratic candidate who is a good fit for Texas and Florida gains a lot of credibility as a general election candidate. Also aside from Texas favored sons most candidates won't be able to spend freely like Sanders will or have the organization to power volunteer canvassing. Now we move to the last grouping.

The Outer South:

State Delegate Total Bernie Delegate Target 2016 Delegate Total
North Carolina 110 50%+ (60) Bernie 47[41.0%] (Hillary 60) 107 Total
Virginia 99 40%+ (40) Bernie 33[35.2%] (Hillary 62) 95 Total
Maryland 79 40%+ (30) Bernie 35[33.8%] (Hillary 60) 95 Total
Tennessee 64 60%+ (38) Bernie 23[32.5%] (Hillary 44) 67 Total
Kentucky 46 60%+ (28) Bernie 27[46.3%] (Hillary 28) 55 Total
Oklahoma 37 60%+ (24) Bernie 22[51.9%] (Hillary 18) 40 Total
Arkansas 31 50%+ (17) Bernie 10[30.0] (Hillary 22) 32 Total
West Virginia 24 70%+ (18) Bernie 18[51.4%] (Hillary 11) 29 Total

These are states I address in different places. I include Oklahoma and Arkansas in my Iowa post. However I didn't have the delegate targets when I wrote it so I'll talk about them here. The other states I sort of group together as Appalachia. That's why you see West Virginia included. Maryland is a little less Southern than Virginia but its a state with a large urban metro area, Baltimore, and quite a lot of black voters relative to New England. So its similar demographically to the other states. As you can see unfortunately based on the 2016 vote many states where Bernie did better and where I have him improving decently took hits to their delegate counts because they went hard for Trump. Bit self-defeating to disenfranchise states that went red since blue states already support you but that's the Democrats for you.

I have Bernie picking up a lot of the vote in the Outer South states and although nearly every single one lost total delegates after 2016 he will get a decent delegate share as well. In fact as Bernie campaigns there I would advise him to mention how their states lost representation and why, because Hillary was a bad candidate for them. With Bernie at the helm in 2020 most of these states would see quite an increase in vote share based delegate count. An important factor is that establishment candidates are quite split while Bernie voters so far really only have him and Warren and I wouldn't expect Warren to get passed the early states in a primary campaign where Bernie is doing well. That means that a lot of their votes will be wasted in these states, as none of them use a caucus. I'd expect to see splits between Harris, Booker, Gillibrand, Castro and Beto that would put a few of them below the 15% line. In fact unfortunately in the very high share Bernie states I'm actually relying on this phenomenon to cushion Bernie and perhaps if he campaigns super well get him the last 76 delegates he needs to get to 50%+1.

Its relevant to note that he needs to spend his campaign time and money very well and get strong on the issues and avoid major gaffes in order to crack the first round win threshold. Its highly unlikely other candidates would side with him if he was at 40% of delegates or even 45%. The establishment absolutely does not want him to win.

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SandersForPresident: search results – bernie

Election Day Megathread: Colorado, Maryland, New York, Oklahoma, and Utah Primaries; Mississippi and South Carolina Runoff

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If you live in Colorado, Maryland, New York, Oklahoma, Utah, Mississippi or South Carolina than today is your primary election.


IWILLVOTE.com


Get out there and vote; take your friend, family, coworker and neighbor.


Find Your Polling Station:

State Polling Location Poll Hours State Subreddit
Colorado Find Your Location 7AM – 7PM r/Colorado4Sanders
Maryland Find Your Location 7AM – 7PM r/Maryland4Sanders
Mississippi Find Your Location 7AM – 7PM r/MississippiForSanders
New York Find Your Location 6AM – 9PM r/NewYorkForSanders
Oklahoma Find Your Location 7AM – 7PM r/OklahomaForSanders
South Carolina Find Your Location 7AM – 7PM r/SouthCarolina4Sanders
Utah Find Your Location 7AM – 8PM r/Utah4Sanders

Endorsements:


Election Protection hotline 1-866-OUR-VOTE – If you experience voter intimidation, want to report complaints or just have questions.


Results:

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SandersForPresident: search results – bernie

Recommendations for progressive candidates in the primaries in Colorado, Maryland, New York (Federal), Oklahoma and Utah. And runoff elections in South Carolina and Mississippi. Plus a bonus special election in Texas on June 30th.

Donate and support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/bePatron?c=1785147

The primary elections take place Tuesday June 26th in Colorado, Maryland, New York (Federal), Oklahoma and Utah. In addition, there are runoff elections in Mississippi and South Carolina on June 26th. Note also that there is a special election in Texas on June 30th, that I’m including in this post. Here are BKAS-recommended progressive candidates in those states. In general, these candidates are Berniecrats, with positions similar to Bernie. But not every candidate supports every position Bernie has, so check their linked webpage to be sure about supporting them. You may need to scroll down to find your state. Finally, scroll down all the way to the comments on this post, because sometimes people leave comments about other good progressives running in downballot races.


Colorado

Note that Colorado has primaries that are open to unaffiliated voters, which means if you are not registered with any party, you can choose to affiliate with that party on election day and then you can vote in their primary. If you are already registered with a party, you have to vote on their ballot.


Governor:

Cary Kennedy (Democrat) is pretty progressive and supports a public option for the ACA, 2 years free college tuition and raising the minimum wage. There is also a Green Party candidate Veronique Bellamy, but she only has a Facebook page and it’s not very active.

US Senator:

There is no US Senate race in Colorado this year.

US Representatives:

CO-01: Saira Rao (Justice Democrat Candidate)

CO-02: Joe Neguse or Mark Williams

CO-03: Arn Menconi (Green Party Candidate) seems the most progressive choice. On the Democratic side, Diane Mitsch Bush says she would “advocate for universal, single-payer health care”. But she doesn’t mention free college tuition or raising the minimum wage.

CO-04: Steven “Chase” Kohne

CO-05: The most progressive choice seems to me to be a write-in candidate on the Democratic side Marcus Murphy. Stephany Rose Spaulding is a Justice Democrat candidate, but her website does not mention Medicare-for-All, free college tuition or raising the minimum wage. As a voter in this district, you’ll have to decide if you want to vote Spaulding (who has a better chance to win, but as I said, does not mention progressive positions on her website) or Marcus Murphy (who seems more progressive, but has a low chance of winning as a write-in candidate).

CO-06: Levi Tilleman (endorsed by Our Revolution). Another option is independent Dan Chapin, who also has very progressive positions.

CO-07: Independent Nathan Clay is the most progressive choice.

Secretary of State: Jena Griswold is the only Democratic candidate.

Attorney General: Joe Salazar (endorsed by Our Revolution)

State Treasurer: Bernard Douthit (endorsed by Our Revolution)

State Senate Candidates:

Here is a list of candidates running for Colorado State Senate races. I have not had time to research them, so you will need to click on their linked webpages and see which ones you want to support.

State House Candidates:

Here is a list of candidates running for Colorado State House races. I have not had time to research them, so you will need to click on their linked webpages and see which ones you want to support.

I will note that Emily Sirota (wife of progressive journalist David Sirota) is running in District 9 and is a great choice. She is also endorsed by Our Revolution.


Maryland

Note that Maryland has closed primaries, which means you need to registered in the party to vote for their candidates in the primary. There are lots of candidates endorsed by Our Revolution that are running in Maryland.


Governor:

Ben Jealous (endorsed by Our Revolution and Justice Democrats)

US Senator:

Chelsea Manning or Jerome Segal

US Representatives:

MD-01: Allison Galbraith or Michael Pullen

MD-02: Jake Pretot seems significantly more progressive than the incumbent, although he does not mention Medicare-for-All on his website

MD-03: The incumbent John Sarbanes has co-sponsored HR676 (Medicare-for-All bill in Congress), but his challenger Adam DeMarco seems overall more progressive

MD-04: The incumbent Anthony Brown has cosponsored HR 676 (Medicare-for-All), though he is otherwise a rather moderate Democrat. He does not have a more progressive challenger.

MD-05: Dennis Fritz is much more progressive than the incumbent, Steny Hoyer, who is a quite conservative Democrat. However, Fritz does not specifically mention Medicare-for-All on his website. There is supposed to be a Green party candidate too, Patrick Elder, but I couldn’t find a website for him.

MD-06: There are lots of good candidates in this district. Roger Manno (endorsed by Our Revolution and Justice Democrats) or Andrew Duck or George English or Chris Graves

MD-07: The incumbent Elijah Cummings is very progressive, a member of the House Progressive Caucus and an original co-sponsor of HR 676 (Medicare-for-All).

MD-08: The incumbent Jamie Raskin is very progressive, a Vice Chair of the House Progressive Caucus and an early co-sponsor of Medicare-for-All (HR 676). He has been endorsed by Our Revolution


Secretary of State: In Maryland, the Secretary of State is appointed by the Governor. However, the Secretary of State does not oversee elections in Maryland. That job is done by the Maryland State Board of Elections, which is also appointed by the Governor.


Also, here are Ballotpedia links for the Maryland State House and State Senate races. I haven’t had time to research these candidates, so you’ll have to do your own research on them.

State Senate:

Here are some specific State Senate candidates endorsed by Our Revolution:

Tommi Makila, State Senate District 27

Robbie Leonard, State Senate District 42


State House:

Here are some specific House of Delegates candidates endorsed by Our Revolution:

Samir Paul, State House District 16

Vaughn Stewart, State House District 19

Wala Blegay, State House District 25

Kirkland Hall, State House District 38

Gabriel Acevero, State House District 39

Richard Bruno, House District 41


Other races endorsed by Our Revolution:

Baltimore County Council, District 1 – Sheila Ruth

Baltimore County Executive – John Olszewski Jr.

Howard County Council, District 3 – Hiruy Hadgu

Montgomery County Council, At-large – Brandy Brooks, Chris Wilhelm and Danielle Meitiv

Montgomery County Executive – Marc Elrich


New York (Federal)

Note that New York has closed primaries, which means that can only vote in a primary if you are registered in that party (and you had to be already registered 11 months prior to the primary). Also, New York (unlike any other state that I know about) has separate primaries for Federal races (US House and US Senate) and state and local races (Governor, State House, State Senate, local races, etc). The Federal race primary is on June 26 and is covered in this post. The state-level primary will be on September 13 and will be covered later.


In New York City and the counties of Nassau, Suffolk, Westchester, Rockland, Orange, Putnam, Dutchess and Erie, POLLS OPEN AT 6 AM – CLOSE AT 9 PM. In all other counties, POLLS OPEN AT 12 NOON and CLOSE AT 9 PM.


US Senator:

The incumbent is Kirsten Gillibrand. She supports Bernie’s Medicare-for-All bill in the Senate. She also has some other progressive stances, but in the past, she was a member of the neoliberal New Democratic Coalition. She is unopposed in the Democratic primary.


US Representatives:

Some of these races have a lot of progressive candidates. For those races, I’m recommending a candidate. Feel free to ignore my recommendation and vote for who you want. I’m just trying to not split up the progressive vote too much, so we hopefully won’t lose the primary.

NY-01: Lots of good candidates in this district: David Pechefsky or Perry Gershon or Vivian Viloria-Fisher. It seems like Elaine DiMasi might also support single-payer healthcare, but her website is a little vague on that. The Working Families Party also has a candidate Patricia Latzman (no website yet), but she is unopposed. If you plan to vote for the WFP candidate in the Fall, you might consider voting for one of the progressive Democrats in the Dem primary (assuming of course that you are a registered Democrat), so that one of the progressives can win against the other candidates in this race).

I recommend David Pechefsky

NY-02: Liuba Grechen Shirley (endorsed by Our Revolution)

NY-03: No recommendation

NY-04: No recommendation

NY-05: The incumbent Gregory Meeks cosponsored HR 676 (Medicare-for-All), but is otherwise quite conservative and has an association with the Awan brothers. If you don’t like Meeks, an option is Mizan Choudhoury, though he doesn’t mention Medicare-for-All, free college tuition or raising the minimum wage on his website.

NY-06: The incumbent Grace Meng supports HR 676 (Medicare-for-All) and is fairly progressive; another option is Tom Hillgardner (Green Party Candidate)

NY-07: Nydia Velazquez

NY-08: The incumbent Hakeem Jeffries is fairly progressive and supports Medicare-for-All

NY-09: The incumbent Yvette Clark is pretty progressive and an original co-sponsor of Medicare-for-All, though she has an association with the Awan brothers; A better option is Adem Bunkeddeko

NY-10: Jerry Nadler

NY-11: Lots of good candidate who all support Medicare-for-All: Michael Devito Jr. (Justice Democrat Candidate) or Michael DeCillis or Omar Vaid or Zach Emig or Paul Sperling or Henry Bardel (Green Party Candidate)

I recommend Omar Vaid

NY-12: The incumbent Carolyn Maloney has cosponsored HR676 (Medicare-for-All) and is moderately progressive; A more progressive choice is Suraj Patel or Green Party candidate Scott Hutchins

NY-13: Adriano Espaillat

NY-14: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (Justice Democrat and BrandNew Congress Candidate and endorsed by Our Revolution)

NY-15: Jose Serrano

NY-16: The incumbent Ellliot Engel has cosponsored HR 676 (Medicare-for-All), though he’s overall fairly conservative. Jonathan Lewis is a much better progressive who supports Medicare-for-All and other strong stances. Joyce Briscoe has a really nice platform, but doesn’t mention Medicare-for-All unfortunately.

NY-17: The incumbent Nita Lowey is cosponsoring the Medicare-for-All bill in Congress. She is not that progressive, but she does not have any progressive challengers.

NY-18: The incumbent Sean Maloney is very conservative and has not cosponsored Medicare-for-All. He does not have a Democratic primary challenger, but Scott Smith will be challenging him as an independent in the Fall election. Smith doesn’t seem to have a website yet (so I don’t know his policy positions), but here is an article about his candidacy.

NY-19: Dave Clegg or Brian Flynn. Antonio Delgado is also a decent candidate, though his commitment to Medicare-for-All does not seem as strong as Clegg or Flynn. Note that I am NOT recommending the Justice Democrat Candidate in this race (Jeff Beals) because of this article detailing his links to the CIA and the Clinton wing of the Democratic party. There is also a Green Party candidate Steve Greenfield and a Working Families Party Candidate Bob Cohen (no website yet). Two independents Luisa Parker and Diane Neal also seem to support a Medicare-for-All type system, though their websites are not as clear as they could be.

Lots of candidates here, who will likely split the progressive vote!! I recommend Dave Clegg.

NY-20: The incumbent Paul Tonko is pretty progressive and supports HR 676 (Medicare-for-All)

NY-21: Patrick Nelson (Justice Democrat Candidate) or Dylan Ratigan or David Mastrianni – Mastrianni’s main issue is Medicare-for-All, but I’m not sure where he stands on other issues; Nelson and Ratigan both support many progressive positions including Medicare-for-All. Tedra Cobb says “Provide comprehensive health insurance for all United States residents, such as what is detailed in the United States National Health Care Act (H.R. 676)”, though it is a bit hard to determine how committed she is to Medicare-for-All. There is also a Green Party candidate Lynn Kahn.

I recommend Patrick Nelson

NY-22: No recommendation

NY-23: There are lots of good choices here: Ian Golden (Justice Democrat Candidate) or Eddie Sundquist or Linda Andrei or John G Hertzler (independent candidate)

I recommend Eddie Sundquist

NY-24: Dana Balter (endorsed by Our Revolution) or Bill Bass (Independent candidate)

NY-25: Rachel Barnhart or Robin Wilt. Adam McFadden also says he supports universal healthcare, but he seems a little less strong in his wording of support than either Barnhart or Wilt.

I recommend Robin Wilt

NY-26: The incumbent Brian Higgins is cosponsoring the Medicare-for-All bill (HR 676), though he is not as progressive as I’d like. He has no challengers.

NY-27: Nathan McMurray


Oklahoma

Note that Oklahoma has partially closed primaries, which means the parties can decide whether or not to allow unaffiliated voters to participate in their primaries. The Democratic party in Oklahoma has decided to allow independents as well as registered Democrats to vote in their primary (but if you’re a registered Republican, you won’t be able to vote in the Democratic primary). Only registered Republicans can vote in the Republican primary. Note also that Oklahoma has runoff elections if no candidate receives 50% of the vote.


Governor:

Connie Johnson (endorsed by Our Revolution)

US Senator:

There is no US Senate race in Oklahoma this year.

US Representatives:

OK-01: Gwendolyn Fields

OK-02: Jason Nichols seems the best candidate, though he does not mention Medicare-for-All, free college tuition or raising the minimum wage. But he does mention Net Neutrality, infrastructure spending and gun background checks.

OK-03: Murray Thibodeaux

OK-04: Roxann Klutts

OK-05: Eddie Porter or Tom Guild


Secretary of State:

The Secretary of State is an appointed position in Oklahoma (appointed by the Governor). But elections are overseen by the Oklahoma State Election Board, a three member board, also appointed by the Governor.


Also, here are Ballotpedia links for the Oklahoma State House and State Senate races. I haven’t had time to research these candidates, so you’ll have to do your own research on them.

State Senate:


State House:

Here are some candidates endorsed by Our Revolution:

Angela Graham, State House District 66 is endorsed by Our Revolution

Shay White, State House District 77 is endorsed by Our Revolution


Utah

Note that Utah also has partially closed primaries, which means the parties can decide whether or not to allow unaffiliated voters to participate in their primaries. If you are unaffiliated, you can affiliate with a party at the polling location on the day of voting. The Democratic party in Utah has decided to allow independents as well as registered Democrats to vote in their primary (but if you’re a registered Republican, you won’t be able to vote in the Democratic primary). Only registered Republicans can vote in the Republican primary.


Note that Utah had a convention prior to the primary. At the convention, they chose candidates for each race. Only if no candidate received 60% or more of the votes, would there be a primary. So, in most of these races, the candidate is already set. In Congressional District 1, no candidate received 60% of the vote at the convention. So, there is a primary race in District 1. Some of the state-level races also have primaries with multiple candidates, so be sure to vote, even if the Dem candidate for Congress has already been chosen in your district.


US Senator:

The Democratic candidate is Jenny Wilson. She doesn’t mention Medicare-for-All, free college tuition or raising the minimum wage on her website.


US Representatives:

UT-01: This race has a real primary! I recommend Kurt Weiland, who has a strong progressive Berniecrat platform!! There is also a Green Party candidate Adam Davis

UT-02: Shireen Ghorbani won at the convention, so she is the only Dem running; she supports raising the minimum wage and free college tuition, but didn’t mention Medicare-for-All (though she would protect Medicare and Medicaid)

UT-03: James Singer won at the convention and is a strong Berniecrat.

UT-04: Ben McAdams won at the convention and is an establishment Dem, who doesn’t mention Medicare-for-All on his website.


Secretary of State: Utah does not have a Secretary of State position. Elections are overseen by the Lt. Governor’s Office. There is no Lt. Governor election this year in Utah. The next one will take place in 2020.


Also, here are Ballotpedia links for the Utah State House and State Senate races. Some of them have only one candidate on the Democratic side, but some have challengers. Be sure to read up on the candidates in your district (I didn’t have time to research all the state-level races myself). I’ve also listed the races where there will be a Green Party candidate in the November general election.

State Senate:

One Green Party Candidate for Utah State Senate

Abrian Velarde, District 12


State House:

Two Green Party Candidates for Utah House

Edward Bodily, District 33

Matt Styles, District 61


Mississippi Runoff Election:

There is a runoff election for the Democratic candidate for Roger Wicker’s seat in the Senate. David Baria and Howard Sherman are competing. Sherman seems more progressive and supports Medicaid expansion in Mississippi. Baria did not even mention Medicaid expansion, much less a universal healthcare program. Also, if you’re in Congressional District 3 and voted Republican in the June 5th primary or did not vote at all on June 5th, then you can participate in a runoff for the Republican candidate – Michael Guest vs Whit Hughes. Both seem pretty conservative.


South Carolina Runoff Election:

Voters who voted in a party's primary on June 12th, can only vote only in the runoff of the same party. Voters who did not vote in the primary, may vote in either party's runoff.

There are runoffs in the following races (and possibly also in some downballot races as well). Note that I have only listed the progressive option for the Democratic races, but both options for the Republicans (since I didn’t research the Republican candidates myself):

Republican candidate for Governor – Henry McMaster vs. John Steven Warren Jr. Both seem quite conservative.

Democratic candidate for Congressional District 2 – Sean Carrigan is the progressive in this race!

Democratic candidate for Congressional District 4 – Doris Lee Turner

Republican candidate for Congressional District 4 – Marvin Lee Bright vs William Timmons IV. Both are very conservative.

Democratic candidate for Congressional District 7 – Mal Hyman (endorsed by Our Revolution)

Republican candidate for Attorney General – Todd Atwater vs Michael Alan Wilson


Texas Special Election on June 30

Also, heads up that there is a special election in Texas Congressional District 27 on Saturday June 30, with progressive Eric Holguin competing as a Democrat.

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SandersForPresident: search results – bernie

Election Day Megathread: Maine, Nevada, North Dakota, South Carolina, and Virginia Primaries

Donate and support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/bePatron?c=1785147

IWILLVOTE.com


If you live in Maine, Nevada, North Dakota, South Carolina or Virginia than today is your primary election. Our political revolution depends on people like you going out into your community, fighting for real reform, and electing candidates who will stand up for our shared progressive vision for our country. Find your polling place at the link below and bring a friend to vote.

Bernie


Get out there and vote; take your friend, family, coworker and neighbor.


Find Your Polling Station:

State Polling Location Poll Hours
Maine Find Your Location 6-10AM – 8PM
Nevada Find Your Location 7AM – 7PM
North Dakota Find Your Location 7-9AM – 7-9PM
South Carolina Find Your Location 7AM – 7PM
Virginia Find Your Location 6AM – 7PM

Endorsements:


Election Protection hotline 1-866-OUR-VOTE – If you experience voter intimidation, want to report complaints or just have questions.


Results:

submitted by /u/SFPMegathread
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SandersForPresident: search results – self:yes

Bernie: On June 12th there will be primary elections in Maine, South Carolina, North Dakota, Virginia, and Nevada. The most important thing we can do in the fight against the reactionary GOP agenda is show up to vote for progressive candidates across the country, in every state and every district.

Donate and support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/bePatron?c=1785147

Bernie: On June 12th there will be primary elections in Maine, South Carolina, North Dakota, Virginia, and Nevada. The most important thing we can do in the fight against the reactionary GOP agenda is show up to vote for progressive candidates across the country, in every state and every district. submitted by /u/Chartis
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SandersForPresident: search results – bernie

Recommendations for progressive candidates in the primaries in Maine, Nevada, North Dakota, South Carolina and Virginia

Donate and support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/bePatron?c=1785147

The primary elections take place Tuesday June 12th in Maine, Nevada, North Dakota, South Carolina and Virginia. Here are BKAS-recommended progressive candidates in those states. In general, these candidates are Berniecrats, with positions similar to Bernie. But not every candidate supports every position Bernie has, so check their linked webpage to be sure about supporting them. You may need to scroll down to find your state. Finally, scroll down all the way to the comments on this post, because sometimes people leave comments about other good progressives running in downballot races.


Maine

Note that Maine has primaries that are open to unaffiliated voters, which means if you are not registered with any party, then you can choose which ballot to vote on. However, if you are registered, then you must vote in that party’s primary.


Governor:

Betsy Sweet

US Senator:

Zak Ringelstein.

US Representatives:

ME-01: Chellie Pingree

ME-02: Jonathan Fulford or Craig Olson

Secretary of State:

This is not an elected position in Maine. Instead, the Maine Constitution says “The Secretary of State shall be chosen biennially at the first session of the Legislature, by joint ballot of the Senators and Representatives in convention”.

State Senate Candidates:

Here is a list of candidates running for Maine State Senate races. I have not had time to research them, so you will need to click on their linked webpages and see which ones you want to support.

State House Candidates:

Here is a list of candidates running for Maine State House races. I have not had time to research them, so you will need to click on their linked webpages and see which ones you want to support.


Nevada

Note that Nevada has closed primaries, which means you can only vote in a particular primary if you are already registered with that party.


Governor:

Chris Giunchigliani or David Jones

US Senator:

Jesse Sbaih or Drew Knight or Barry Michaels (Independent candidate)

US Representatives:

NV-01: Reuben D’Silva

NV-02: Patrick Fogarty or Rick Shepherd

NV-03: John “Jack” Love, Michael Weiss or Richard Hart

NV-04: Amy Vilela (Justice Democrat and Brand New Congress Candidate and endorsed by Our Revolution)

Secretary of State:

There is only one Democratic candidate, Nelson Araujo, who is currently a State Assemblyman. He supports allowing same-day and automatic voter registration.

State Senate:

Here is a list of candidates running for Nevada State Senate races. I have not had time to research them, so you will need to click on their linked webpages and see which ones you want to support.

State Assembly:

Here is a list of candidates running for Nevada State Assembly races. I have not had time to research them, so you will need to click on their linked webpages and see which ones you want to support.


North Dakota

North Dakota has open primaries, which means you can choose which ballot you want to vote on when you get to the polling place.


Governor:

There is no Governor’s race in North Dakota in 2018.

US Senator and US House of Representatives:

BKAS is not making any recommendations for either the US Senate or the US House race in North Dakota this year, since there are no Berniecrats running.

Secretary of State:

There is only one Democratic candidate Josh Boschee, who says he wants to “modernize the office to reduce wasteful spending, eliminate duplicative regulations and increase efficiencies to support our state's small business owners, nonprofit leaders and family farmers”.

State Senate:

Here is a list of candidates running for North Dakota State Senate races. I have not had time to research them, so you will need to click on their linked webpages and see which ones you want to support.

State House:

Here is a list of candidates running for North Dakota State House races. I have not had time to research them, so you will need to click on their linked webpages and see which ones you want to support.


South Carolina

Note that South Carolina has open primaries, which means you can choose which ballot you want to vote on when you get to the polling place.


Governor:

Marguerite Willis seems the most progressive option.

US Representatives:

SC-01: Dimitri Cherny (note that he is a Republican – if you want to vote for him, you must take a Republican ballot)

SC-02: Sean Carrigan

SC-03: Mary Smith Geren (endorsed by Our Revolution, though she doesn’t mention Medicare-for-All on her website)

SC-04: The incumbent Trey Gowdy resigned, so this is an open seat; Recommendations include Will Morin or possibly Doris Lee Turner, though her website is rather skimpy and it is hard to determine if she supports Medicare-for-All or other progressive policies

SC-05: Steve Lough

SC-06: Bryan Pugh (Green Party Candidate)

SC-07: Bruce Fischer or Mal Hyman (endorsed by Our Revolution)

Secretary of State:

There is only one Democratic candidate, Melvin Whittenburg, who says he will “build a team that will work collectively to serve all South Carolinians with the utmost respect, dignity, and integrity”. His website is mainly focused on the business aspects of being Secretary of State with nothing about elections. However, the elections in South Carolina are not overseen by the Secretary of State, but by the South Carolina Election Commission, a five member board appointed by the Governor.

State Senate:

There is no State Senate election in South Carolina this year. The next one will take place in 2020.

State House:

Here is a list of candidates running for South Carolina State House races. I have not had time to research them, so you will need to click on their linked webpages and see which ones you want to support.


Virginia

Note that Virginia has open primaries, which means you do not need to be associated with any particular party to vote in their primary.


US Senator:

Tim Kaine is a very conservative Democrat and is up for re-election. Unfortunately, there are no Democrats primarying him, so you won’t be able to vote for an alternate candidate.

US Representatives:

VA-01: Edwin Santana or John Suddarth

VA-02: Karen Mallard or Shaun Brown (independent candidate)

VA-03: The incumbent Bobby Scott is unopposed. He supports HR 676 (Medicare-for-all)

VA-04: The incumbent Donald McEachin is unopposed. He is a moderate Democrat and does not support Medicare-for-All.

VA-05: This district used a convention to nominate candidates, rather than a primary. They have already nominated Leslie Cockburn

VA-06: Jennifer Lewis (Endorsed by Our Revolution)

VA-07: Helen Alli, running under the Whig party has the most progressive stances.

VA-08: No recommendation

VA-09: Justin Santopietro or Anthony Flaccavento (Endorsed by Our Revolution) – my favorite candidate in this race is Santopietro, but Flaccavento is also quite good and endorsed by Our Revolution

VA-10: Julia Biggins (endorsed by the northern VA chapter of Our Revolution) h/t to /u/bippycup

VA-11: Unfortunately, the most progressive candidate (Jonathan Park) seems to have dropped out. The incumbent Gerald Connolly is unopposed. He is quite conservative and does not support Medicare-for-All.

Secretary of State: Virginia’s elections are not overseen by a Secretary of State. Instead, they have a 3-member Board of Elections that is appointed by the Governor and headed by a Commissioner. You won’t be able to vote on this position.

Virginia State Senate:

There is no election for the State Senate this year. Next elections will be in 2019.

Virginia State House of Delegates:

There is no election for the House of Delegates this year. Next elections will be in 2019.


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