Help, voting issue

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My friend is in Kuwait and cant figure out how to fax a signed copy of the form that was generated from the overseas absentee voter website to his voter district fax to have the ballot sent to him. Can anyone walk me through it who might have some experience with over the phone tech help? Every time he signs the pdf on his phone and saves it, he goes to fax it with TinyFax and his signature is gone. Thanks.

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Voting recommendations for the New Hampshire primary (Tuesday September 11)

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New Hampshire primary

Note that New Hampshire has primaries that are open to unaffiliated voters, which means that if you are registered with a party, you have to vote in their primary, but if you are not registered with any party, you can choose which primary to vote in.


Governor:

Both Steve Marchand and Molly Kelly are pretty good candidates, though they are not calling for a Medicare-for-All type policy for NH. I think Marchand has a more detailed website and well-thought out plans for the state.

US Senator:

There is no US Senate race in New Hampshire this year.

US Representatives:

NH-01: There are lots of good candidates (and lots of candidates overall) I suggest one of the following: Levi Sanders, Deaglen McEachern, Mindi Messmer, Terence O’Rourke or Lincoln Soldati.

NH-02: Incumbent Democrat Annie Kuster is very conservative for a Democrat. She does not support Medicare-for-All, but she does not have a Democratic primary opponent. Among the Republicans, Stewart Levenson says he wants to get rid of Obamacare, but keep protections for pre-existing conditions and allow children to stay on the parent’s policies up to age 26. He’s the only Republican running who says anything about needing to find a way to cover people with pre-existing conditions.


Here are some state-level races, which I didn't have time to research. The links will take you to lists of the candidates, so you can decide for yourself.


State Executive Council: (also called the Governor’s Council. It’s role is to approve the majority of expenditures in the state budget and oversee receipts and spending for state departments and agencies)

https://ballotpedia.org/New_Hampshire_Executive_Council_election,_2018


State Senate:

https://ballotpedia.org/New_Hampshire_State_Senate_elections,_2018


State House:

https://ballotpedia.org/New_Hampshire_House_of_Representatives_elections,_2018


State Ballot Measures:

https://ballotpedia.org/New_Hampshire_2018_ballot_measures


Only three states are left to vote for primary candidates. We have two more elections this week (Rhode Island (Wednesday) and New York (Thursday)). Louisiana does not have a primary. They go directly to the general election (November 6th), with a runoff in case no candidate gets at least 50% of the vote. Here is a link to Louisiana candidates, so you can support the progressives now and hopefully get them above the 50% level (or at least into a runoff)!!

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Recommendations for Progressive Candidates in the Primary in Rhode Island (Primary on Wednesday 12 September 2018, mail voting available now)

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Rhode Island primary

Note that Rhode Island has primaries that are open to unaffiliated voters, which means that if you are registered with a party, you have to vote in their primary, but if you are not registered with any party, you can choose which primary to vote in. Also please note that voting is on a Wednesday in Rhode Island this year, rather than Tuesday.

Below are candidates from our BKAS series that have progressive values. In general, the list contains candidates who have Bernie-like positions – Medicare-for-All, increased minimum wage, getting money out of politics, free college tuition, etc. However, not every candidate may support every position Bernie has. If you don’t know the candidate, check out their linked webpage. If you are not comfortable voting for any of these candidates, you can find others running in these races listed on the Green Papers or Ballotpedia for US Senate, Ballotpedia for US House or Ballotpedia for Governor.


Starting in mid 2017, I began doing the Better Know a State (BKAS) series describing candidates for various offices in each state. I started alphabetically (Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, etc.), but then realized I probably should do them in order of their primaries. So, I switched to that system. It happens that New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Louisiana have the latest primaries of all the states. So, they were the last three states to be finished for the BKAS. As it turns out, I didn’t manage to finish those 3 BKAS posts before I got overwhelmed with actual primaries where I had to post voting recommendations. All this is simply to say that I have not completed a BKAS post on Rhode Island.


Governor:

The current Governor, Gina Raimondo, is running for re-election. She is being challenged by Spencer Dickinson, who supports universal healthcare and getting big money out of politics, and Matt Brown, who supports Medicare-for-All, reversing cuts to Medicaid, $ 15/hr minimum wage, union rights, 100% renewable energy in Rhode Island by 2035, etc. I think both Dickinson and Brown are better than Raimondo. Also, note that Matt Brown is endorsed by Our Revolution and is a Justice Democrat candidate. There is also a candidate of the Compassion Party, Anne Armstrong.


Lt. Governor:

The incumbent David McKee is running again. Aaron Regunberg (Justice Democrat and endorsed by Our Revolution) is more progressive and supports Medicare-for-All, paid sick leave, fighting climate change, etc.


US Senator: Incumbent Senator, Sheldon Whitehouse, is very progressive and signed on as a co-sponsor of Bernie’s Medicare-for-All bill (S.1804). He does have one challenger, Pat Fontes, an activist for peace and environmental causes. She says she’s running for Congress “to find out what happens when a first-time senator tries to promote legislation which would benefit most Americans”. I think she would promote progressive policies, though her website is a bit skimpy.


US Representatives:

RI-01: Incumbent David Cicilline is a fairly progressive Democrat and a member of the Medicare-for-All Congress. He’s a member of the Anti-Trust Caucus in Congress and he favors net neutrality. He has an opponent Chris Young, who is something of a perennial candidate. Young seems to support the ability to discharge student debt and raising the cap on Social Security, though I found his policy positions page to be a little difficult to understand.

RI-02: Incumbent Jim Langevin is pretty conservative for a Democrat. He was a late co-sponsor of HR 676 (Conyers’ Medicare-for-All bill), only signing on about 7 months after the fill had come out. And he has not joined the Medicare-for-All caucus. His only opponent is Republican Sal Calozzo.


Secretary of State:

There is only one Democratic candidate, current Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea. She talks about elections and cybersecurity on her website. Rhode Island state law calls for risk-limiting audits of elections, which minimizes the chances for tampering with the vote.


Attorney General:

The current Attorney General cannot run again, due to term limits. There is only one Democratic candidate, Peter Neronha. His website discusses gun safety, environmental issues, public integrity and crime. His opponent from the Compassion Party, Alan Gordon, has filed a complaint to the Democratic Party about Neronha’s candidacy, because Neronha is covered by still-binding federal security clearances and related non-disclosure agreements from his time at the Department of Justice. Gordon states that these agreements will impair Neronha’s ability to prosecute certain cases. Gordon’s website talks about child trafficking and it appears he wants to fight that. But it does not give any information about his background or other policy positions.


Also, here are Ballotpedia links for other State-level races. I haven’t had time to research these candidates, so you’ll have to do your own research on them.

Treasurer:

https://ballotpedia.org/Rhode_Island_Treasurer_election,_2018


State Senate:

https://ballotpedia.org/Rhode_Island_State_Senate_elections,_2018

Endorsed by Our Revolution

District 5 – Sam Bell

District 30 – Jeanine Calkin


State House:

You may want to read this article about progressive RI State Representatives before making your choices in state races.

https://ballotpedia.org/Rhode_Island_House_of_Representatives_elections,_2018

Endorsed by Our Revolution

District 5 – Marcia Ranglin-Vassell


State Ballot Measures:

https://ballotpedia.org/Rhode_Island_2018_ballot_measures


Finally, I may have missed some candidates, so if anyone else knows of a good progressive I’ve left off this list, let me know.

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Voting Recommendations for the Tuesday August 28 Primaries in Arizona and Florida and the Runoff Elections in Oklahoma

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The primary elections take place Tuesday August 21st in Arizona and Florida and there will be a runoff election in Oklahoma that day as well. Here are BKAS-recommended progressive candidates in those states. In general, these candidates are Berniecrats, with positions similar to Bernie. But not every candidate supports every position Bernie has, so check their linked webpage to be sure about supporting them. You may need to scroll down to find your state. Finally, scroll down all the way to the comments on this post, because sometimes people leave comments about other good progressives running in downballot races.


Arizona

Note that Arizona has primaries that are open to unaffiliated voters, which means that if you are registered with a party, you have to vote in their primary, but if you are not registered with any party, you can choose which primary to vote in.


Governor:

Kelly Fryer or David Garcia


US Senator:

Deedra Abboud (Justice Democrat Candidate). There is also a write-in Green Party candidate, Angela Green, though she describes herself as “a Democrat with a Republican background running as a Green Candidate” and also says “I want to be known as the Queen of Capitalism and make these Red and Blue states GREEN with money, organic farming and medicinal marijuana.” She doesn’t sound like a typical Green Party candidate and I question how committed she is to the Green Party agenda.


US Representatives:

AZ-01: Incumbent “Democrat” Tom O’Halleran is extremely conservative for a Democrat. Unfortunately, he does not have a Democratic challenger. The Republican candidates are also very conservative. There is a Libertarian running as a write-in candidate, Zhani Doko. There’s not a ton of information available about him, but he seems to have fairly typical Libertarian positions (free market, fewer regulations) and opposes US involvement in foreign wars.

AZ-02: There are lots of candidates that support Medicare-for-All and other progressive positions. I recommend one of these – Mary Matiella (Justice Democrat Candidate), Billy Kovacs, Barbara Sherry or Bruce Wheeler

AZ-03: Raul Grijalva (Justice Democrat Candidate)

AZ-04: Delina Disanto is the most progressive and supports Medicare-for-All. David Brill supports allowing people to buy into Medicare as a public option.

AZ-05: Joan Greene

AZ-06: Garrick McFadden

AZ-07: The incumbent Ruben Gallego is fairly progressive and signed on to support John Conyers Medicare-for-All bill (HR 676). However, note that he has not yet joined the Medicare-for-All Caucus in Congress, making me question his support… There is a Democratic primary challenger, Catherine Miranda, but she does not call for Medicare-for-All on her website. In addition, there is a write-in Green Party candidate, Gary Swing, though I’m not sure he’s a very serious candidate. I guess voters will have to decide who they prefer in this race.

AZ-08: The only Democrat running is Hiral Tipirneni, who supports allowing people to buy into Medicare as a public option, but does not support Medicare-for-All.

AZ-09: Current Mayor of Phoenix Greg Stanton is the only Democrat running. His website has no information on the policies he supports.


Secretary of State:

There is only one Democratic candidate, Katie Hobbs. She says that “she will act to end the outrageously long lines and crippling incompetence that are preventing Arizonans from participating in our elections”.


Attorney General:

There is one Democratic candidate January Contreras. She previously worked at the Department of Homeland Security under Janet Napolitano.


Other State Executive Offices:

State Superintendent for Public Instruction – David Schapira (endorsed by Our Revolution)


Also, here are Ballotpedia links for other State-level races. I haven’t had time to research these candidates, so you’ll have to do your own research on them.

State Senate:

https://ballotpedia.org/Arizona_State_Senate_elections,_2018

Races endorsed by Our Revolution

District 22 – Brianna Westbrook

District 29 – Martin Quezada

State House:

https://ballotpedia.org/Arizona_House_of_Representatives_elections,_2018

Races endorsed by Our Revolution

District 18 – LaDawn Stuben

District 24 – Marcus Ferrell

Local Ballot Measures:

https://ballotpedia.org/August_28,_2018_ballot_measures_in_Arizona


The following elections are not on the Arizona August 28 primary ballot. They will be on the November 6 general election ballot. I’m just including them here, so voters can look them over now, because with all the races on November 6th, I doubt I will be able to make a specific post about these races. Save this information for November.

Supreme Court:

https://ballotpedia.org/Arizona_Supreme_Court_elections,_2018

Appellate Courts:

https://ballotpedia.org/Arizona_intermediate_appellate_court_elections,_2018

Local Judges:

https://ballotpedia.org/Arizona_local_trial_court_judicial_elections,_2018

State Ballot Measures:

https://ballotpedia.org/Arizona_2018_ballot_measures

Note that one of the four ballot measures would prohibit state and local governments from increasing taxes on services. This includes any kind of tax or fee. Services that are often taxed include things like hair salons, barbers, lawn care, cleaning services, etc. Now, no one wants to pay taxes, but by limiting the ability of locales to increase taxes when needed, you force cuts in government services. I’d argue that allowing state and local governments flexibility in taxing services is a good idea and I would vote “no” on this measure.

School Boards

https://ballotpedia.org/Arizona_school_board_elections,_2018


Florida

Note that Florida has closed primaries, which means you need to registered in the party to vote for their candidates in the primary. There are a couple of exceptions though. All voters can vote in a particular election if (1) if all the candidates for an office have the same party affiliation and the winner of the primary election will not face any opposition in the general election or (2) if the race is non-partisan (as some downballot races are).


Governor:

Andrew Gillum (endorsed by Our Revolution and by Bernie Sanders). There is also a Green Party candidate Bruce Stanley


US Senator:

Incumbent Bill Nelson is the only Democratic candidate. If you don’t want to support Nelson, there is a write-in candidate who says he supports universal healthcare Michael Levinson, though he comes across as a little wacky. There is also a candidate of the Socialist Workers Party running as a write-in Steven Warshell, though virtually no information is available about him online.


US Representatives:

FL-01: There are two Democratic candidates, Jennifer Zimmerman and Phil Ehr, but neither comes across as very progressive.

FL-02: There are two Democratic candidates, Brandon Peters and Bob Rackleff. Neither really mentions Medicare-for-All on his website. But Peters says he supports Medicare-for-All here.

FL-03: Tom Wells or Yvonne Hinson

FL-04: There is only one Democratic candidate, Ges Selmont, though he does not come across as particularly progressive. There are also a couple of independent candidates, Joceline Berrios and Jason Bulger, that seem to lean Democratic, though neither mentions Medicare-for-All on their websites.

FL-05: There are two Democratic candidates, incumbent Al Lawson and Alvin Brown. Neither comes across as particularly progressive on their websites. This page comparing the two suggests Brown supports free college tuition and increasing the minimum wage to $ 15/hr, but neither of those positions is on his website, so…I’m not sure what he really supports.

FL-06: There are three Democratic candidates, Stephen Sevigny, Nancy Soderberg and John Upchurch. Upchurch says he wants to “expand Medicare to cover all Americans”. He also supports raising the cap on contributions to Social Security.

FL-07: Chardo Richardson (Justice Democrat and Brand New Congress Candidate)

FL-08: Sanjay Patel (Justice Democrat candidate and endorsed by Our Revolution)

FL-09: The incumbent Democrat Darren Soto is part of the Medicare-for-All caucus, although overall he’s fairly conservative for a Democrat. Soto has voted in the past to criminalize abortion. He has also "said that he is "open-minded" about phasing out Social Security benefits or eliminating them altogether. Here is a link to an article discussing these points. I personally would not vote for Soto. His primary challenger is Alan Grayson, who supports allowing people to buy into Medicare. Grayson also has a strong platform on getting money out of politics. Vote Grayson!**

FL-10: There are two Democratic candidates, incumbent Val Demings, who is rather conservative for a Democrat, and Wade Darius. Darius supports Medicare-for-All, $ 15/hr minimum wage and free college tuition and other progressive stances.

FL-11: There is one Democratic candidate, Dana Cottrell, who seems to be a conservative Democrat overall, but does support tuition-free college education. However, note she also talks about the “Galveston model” of Social Security, which is a privatized type of retirement plan. There is a write-in candidate who seems much more progressive Luis Saldana. He has quotes from Bernie on his website, including mentions of Medicare-for-All and free college tuition.

FL-12: Robert Tager supports Medicare-for-All or a public option to the ACA. Stephen Perenich supports regulating healthcare like a public utility to bring down costs. A third Democratic candidate, Chris Hunter, seems more conservative and only supports the ACA, but not anything further. There is also an independent, Angela Purkis, but her platform doesn’t really mention healthcare, but she does talk some about income inequality.

FL-13: No recommendation. The only Democrat is Charlie Crist, whose voting record is quite conservative for a Democrat.

FL-14: Kathy Castor. She is a somewhat moderate Democrat, but she is a member of the Medicare-for-All caucus.

FL-15: Raymond Pena Jr or write-in Green Party candidate Dave Johnson

FL-16: Jan Schneider.

FL-17: April Freeman has some good stances such as fighting income inequality, supporting unions and collective bargaining, reforming Wall Street, etc. But she does not seem to support Medicare-for-All.

FL-18: Pam Keith (Justice Democrat candidate). She doesn’t mention Medicare-for-All on her website, but does on her Facebook page.

FL-19: Todd James Truax

FL-20: The incumbent Alcee Hastings supports Medicare-for-All and is a member of the Medicare-for-All caucus. His primary opponent, Sheila Cherfilus also supports Medicare-for-All and seems more progressive overall than Hastings.

FL-21: Lois Frankel is part of the Medicare-for-All caucus. She is unopposed.

FL-22: Jeff Fandl has his own plan to transition slowly to a Medicare-for-All type system. His other positions are progressive too, including free college tuition.

FL-23: Tim Canova is the best candidates. However, note that Tim Canova is running as an independent, which means he will not be on the Democratic primary ballot, where only Debbie Wasserman-Schultz will be listed. You will be able to vote for Canova in the November general election.

FL-24: The incumbent Frederica Wilson supports Medicare-for-All and is part of the Medicare-for-All caucus. She is being challenged by Ricardo De La Fuente, who does not support Medicare-for-All, but does address homelessness and affordable housing on his website. Note also that Ricardo De La Fuente is the son of Roque De La Fuente, a perennial candidate who is running as a Republican in multiple different states.

FL-25: Mary Barzee Flores is the only Democratic candidate. She says “I believe in medicare for all, but I think the road to get there has to be traveled in a way that insures more people along the way, not fewer”. Not sure exactly what she means by that, because if Medicare-for-All is implemented the way it has been proposed so far, there will not be a time with fewer people covered. Flores supports free community college and waiving tuition at 4 year colleges for “students who face economic barriers”.

FL-26: There are two Democrats running, Debbie Mucarsel-Powell and Demetries Grimes, but neither comes across as particularly progressive.

FL-27: Lots of candidates here support Medicare-for-All and other progressive positions, including Michael Hepburn (Justice Democrat and Brand New Congress Candidate), Matt Haggman, Kristen Gonzalez and David Richardson. Another candidate Donna Shalala says she would “create a “Medicare Option for All” by enhancing Medicare to better cover routine dental and vision, and long-term care, and make it available to anyone regardless of income, immigration status, or age. At the same time, preserve employer coverage as an option for those Americans satisfied with their current coverage.” This is not as good as the traditional Medicare-for-All plan supported by Bernie and other progressives. Therefore, I’d recommend that voters don’t choose Shalala.


Here are some state-level races. I mostly haven’t had time to research them (except for a few comments on them below), so people will need to research the candidates in their district. These links to candidates and issues for each race.


Attorney General

https://ballotpedia.org/Florida_Attorney_General_election,_2018

Note that both Democratic candidates seem decent, but Ryan Torrens specifically states that he would not defend the “Stand-your-ground” laws in Florida.


Chief Financial Officer:

https://ballotpedia.org/Florida_Chief_Financial_Officer_election,_2018


Agriculture Commissioner:

https://ballotpedia.org/Florida_Agriculture_Commissioner_election,_2018


State Senate

https://ballotpedia.org/Florida_State_Senate_elections,_2018


State House:

https://ballotpedia.org/Florida_House_of_Representatives_elections,_2018

Endorsed by Our Revolution:

District 66 – Alex Heeren

District 71 – Tracy Pratt


Local ballot measures:

https://ballotpedia.org/August_28,_2018_ballot_measures_in_Florida


School boards:

https://ballotpedia.org/Florida_school_board_elections,_2018

Note: I recommend Elijah Manley, a Green Party candidate for the Broward County School Board


Municipal elections:

Hillsborough County – https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Hillsborough_County,_Florida_(2018)

Jacksonville – https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Jacksonville,_Florida_(2018)

Miami-Dade County – https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Miami-Dade_County,_Florida_(2018)

Orange County- https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Orange_County,_Florida_(2018)

Pinellas County – https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Pinellas_County,_Florida_(2018)


The following elections are not on the Florida August 28 primary ballot. They will be on the November 6 general election ballot. I’m just including them here, so voters can look them over now, because with all the races on November 6th, I doubt I will be able to make a specific post about these races. Save this information for November.

Supreme Court:

https://ballotpedia.org/Florida_Supreme_Court_elections,_2018


Appellate Courts:

https://ballotpedia.org/Florida_intermediate_appellate_court_elections,_2018


State ballot measures:

https://ballotpedia.org/Florida_2018_ballot_measures

Note ballot measure 5 requires that 2/3rds of the legislature is needed to impose new taxes or fees. This means that it will become very difficult to raise taxes in the future if the state needs more income and will force cuts in services during recessions. I would vote no on that one.

Ballot measure 12 prohibits public officials from lobbying for compensation while in office and for six years after leaving office. I think that is a good measure.


Oklahoma Runoff Election

The primary election in Oklahoma took place on June 26. But in Oklahoma, candidates have to get 50% of the vote to win. Otherwise the top two vote getters advance to a runoff election. There are multiple races with runoff elections, which will take place on August 28th.


Oklahoma has partially closed primaries, which means each party gets to decide whether or not they want to let independents vote in their primary. The Democratic party has decided to allow independents to vote in their primary, but the Republican and Libertarian parties are restricting their primaries to registered members of their parties.

Below are descriptions of the runoff elections and who is running.


Governor:

There is no runoff on the Democratic side. For the Republicans, Mick Cornett is facing Kevin Stitt. Cornett does not have an issues page, but Stitt does. For the Libertarians, Rex Lawhorn is facing Chris Powell.

US Senator:

There is no US Senate election in Oklahoma this year.

US Representatives:

OK-01: There is a runoff between Amanda Douglas and Tim Gilpin. Amanda Douglas supports Medicare-for-All. She also supports medical marijuana and strengthening public education. Here is an AMA she did on Reddit. Tim Gilpin wants to expand the ACA and also says he wants to cover everyone. There is also a runoff on the Republican side between Tim Harris and Kevin Hern. I recommend Amanda Douglas.

OK-02: There is a runoff between Democrats Jason Nichols and Clay Padgett. Nichols supports net neutrality, but doesn’t mention any other progressive positions. Padgett mentions protecting Social Security and Medicare, but does not talk about healthcare in general or mention Medicare-for-All. There is also a runoff on the Republican side between incumbent Markwayne Mullin and Richard Castaldo.

OK-03: There is no runoff for US Representative in this district.

OK-04: There is a runoff between Democrats Mary Brannon and Fred Gipson. Brannon is a teacher, one of the many teachers running for office in Oklahoma in response to cuts in education spending. She would protect Medicare and Medicaid and fight to strengthen education. Gipson says on his website “In my campaign I will not accept campaign contributions from PACs, and lobbyists in DC. I will limit the campaign contributions I receive to $ 500 per individual and contributions outside the 4th, while appreciated, will not be accepted.” He is also a strong proponent of education funding. I think both candidates here are pretty good, so I won’t recommend one over the other. The voters can decide which one they want. There is no runoff on the Republican side for this race.

OK-05: There is a Democratic runoff between Tom Guild and Kendra Horn. Guild supports Medicare-for-All, raising the minimum wage, transparency in campaign finances, reform of Wall Street and strengthening public education and supporting teachers. He seems like a really good candidate. Horn supports expanding access to healthcare and reducing drug prices (but does not mention Medicare-for-All). She also supports strengthening public education and raising the minimum wage. I recommend Guild. There is no runoff on the Republican side.


Attorney General:

There is a Republican runoff between Gentner Drummond and Mike Hunter. There is no runoff on the Democratic side.


Auditor and Inspector:

There is a Republican runoff between Cindy Byrd and Charlie Prater. There is no Democratic candidate in this race, though there is a Libertarian candidate (no runoff on the Libertarian side).


Labor Commissioner:

There is a runoff between Republicans Cathy Costello and Leslie Osborn. There is no runoff on the Democratic side.


Superintendent of Public Instruction:

There is a Republican runoff between the incumbent Joy Hofmeister and Linda Murphy. There is no runoff on the Democratic side.


Corporation Commissioner 2: (The Corporation Commission is a regulatory agency for the State of Oklahoma with emphasis on the Fuel, Oil and Gas, Public Utilities, and Transportation Industries)

There is a runoff for both the Democratic and Republican candidates. On the Democratic side, Blake Cummings is facing Ashley McCray. On the Republican side, it will be Bob Anthony facing Brian Bingman.


Here are links to the State Senate and State House races, but I had trouble figuring out who might still be in a runoff election. You can see a sample ballot for your district here and figure out if you have a State Rep or State Senator in a runoff election. I think that the sample ballot will also tell you if you have any runoffs in other state, local or municipal elections.

State Senate:

https://ballotpedia.org/Oklahoma_State_Senate_elections,_2018


State House:

https://ballotpedia.org/Oklahoma_House_of_Representatives_elections,_2018


The following elections are not on the Oklahoma August 28 primary runoff ballot. They will be on the November 6 general election ballot. I’m just including them here, so voters can look them over now, because with all the races on November 6th, I doubt I will be able to make a specific post about these races. Save this information for November.

Supreme Court:

https://ballotpedia.org/Oklahoma_Supreme_Court_elections,_2018

Appellate Courts:

https://ballotpedia.org/Oklahoma_intermediate_appellate_court_elections,_2018

State ballot measures:

https://ballotpedia.org/Oklahoma_intermediate_appellate_court_elections,_2018

Municipal Elections:

Canadian County – https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Canadian_County,_Oklahoma_(2018)

Cleveland County – https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Cleveland_County,_Oklahoma_(2018)

Oklahoma City – https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Oklahoma_City,_Oklahoma_(2018)

Oklahoma County – https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Oklahoma_County,_Oklahoma_(2018)

Osage County – https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Osage_County,_Oklahoma_(2018)

Tulsa (city) – https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Tulsa,_Oklahoma_(2018)

Tulsa (county) – https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Tulsa_County,_Oklahoma_(2018)


Finally, I may have missed some candidates, so if anyone else knows of a good progressive I’ve left off this list, let me know.

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Recommendations for progressive candidates in the primary in New Hampshire (primary on Tuesday September 11, but absentee voting is available now)

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New Hampshire primary

Note that New Hampshire has primaries that are open to unaffiliated voters, which means that if you are registered with a party, you have to vote in their primary, but if you are not registered with any party, you can choose which primary to vote in.

Below are candidates from our BKAS series that have progressive values. In general, the list contains candidates who have Bernie-like positions – Medicare-for-All, increased minimum wage, getting money out of politics, free college tuition, etc. However, not every candidate may support every position Bernie has. If you don’t know the candidate, check out their linked webpage. If you are not comfortable voting for any of these candidates, you can find others running in these races listed on the Green Papers or Ballotpedia for US House or Ballotpedia for Governor.


Starting in mid 2017, I began doing the Better Know a State (BKAS) series describing candidates for various offices in each state. I started alphabetically (Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, etc.), but then realized I probably should do them in order of their primaries. So, I switched to that system. It happens that New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Louisiana have the latest primaries of all the states. So, they were the last three states to be finished for the BKAS. As it turns out, I didn’t manage to finish those 3 BKAS posts before I got overwhelmed with actual primaries where I had to post voting recommendations. All this is simply to say that I have not completed a BKAS post on New Hampshire. However, I did start it and you can find what I’ve written here. It contains a description of some of the candidates for Carol Shea-Porter’s seat in Congress.


Governor:

The current Governor is Republican Chris Sununu, who is running for re-election. His opponents include Democrats Molly Kelly and Steve Marchand and two Libertarians, Aaron Day and Jilleta Jarvis. Among the Democrats, Marchand doesn’t have much on his website about the policies he supports, while Kelly has a pretty extensive platform that includes reducing college costs, paid family and medical leave, increasing minimum wage to $ 15/hr, net neutrality, fighting climate change, legalizing marijuana, increased gun regulations, preserving Medicaid expansion and healthcare access, etc.

US Senator:

There is no US Senate race in New Hampshire this year.

US Representatives:

NH-01: There are a lot of candidates competing for Carol Shea-Porter’s seat in Congress (Shea-Porter is retiring). There are 11 Democrats, 6 Republicans, 1 Libertarian and 2 independents running. This link has information on some of them (though note I ran out of time to finish it). One of the Democrats is Levi Sanders, Bernie Sanders' son. As you may imagine, being influenced by his father, Levi has a very progressive platform. There are numerous other candidats with strong platforms too including Deaglen McEachern, Mindi Messmer, Terence O’Rourke and Lincoln Soldati. Mark Mackenzie also seems like good candidate, though his stance on healthcare is not as clear as I’d like. Chris Pappas and Maura Sullivan support public options to the ACA.

NH-02: Incumbent Democrat Annie Kuster is very conservative for a Democrat. She does not support Medicare-for-All, but she does not have a Democratic primary opponent. I wish some of the great candidates in NH-01 had chosen to run in NH-02 instead. Among the Republicans, Stewart Levenson says he wants to get rid of Obamacare, but keep protections for pre-existing conditions and allow children to stay on the parent’s policies up to age 26. He’s the only Republican running who says anything about needing to find a way to cover people with pre-existing conditions.


Secretary of State:

The New Hampshire Secretary of State is elected every 2 years by the members of the State Senate and State House.


Attorney General:

The New Hampshire Attorney General is appointed by the Governor, with approval from the New Hampshire State Executive Council.


State Executive Council: (also called the Governor’s Council. It’s role is to approve the majority of expenditures in the state budget and oversee receipts and spending for state departments and agencies)

https://ballotpedia.org/New_Hampshire_Executive_Council_election,_2018


Also, here are Ballotpedia links for other State-level contests. I haven’t had time to research them, so you’ll have to do your own research on them.

State Senate:

https://ballotpedia.org/New_Hampshire_State_Senate_elections,_2018

State House:

https://ballotpedia.org/New_Hampshire_House_of_Representatives_elections,_2018

State Ballot Measures:

https://ballotpedia.org/New_Hampshire_2018_ballot_measures


Finally, I may have missed some candidates, so if anyone else knows of a good progressive I’ve left off this list, let me know.

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Recommendations for Progressive Candidates in the Massachusetts Primary (September 4th, but early voting ongoing now)

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Massachusetts primary

Note that Massachusetts has primaries that are open to unaffiliated voters, which means that if you are registered with a party, you have to vote in their primary, but if you are not registered with any party, you can choose which primary to vote in.

Below are candidates from our BKAS series that have progressive values. In general, the list contains candidates who have Bernie-like positions – Medicare-for-All, increased minimum wage, getting money out of politics, free college tuition, etc. However, not every candidate may support every position Bernie has. If you don’t know the candidate, check out their linked webpage. If you are not comfortable voting for any of these candidates, you can find others running in these races listed on the Green Papers or Ballotpedia for US Senate, Ballotpedia for US House or Ballotpedia for Governor. Also, here is the link to the BKAS post on Massachusetts – Massachusetts , but note that it was written way back in late-October of 2017 and candidates have changed. Check the Green Papers or Ballotpedia links above for the most up-to-date list of candidates in your district. The list below includes candidates that have declared since that original Massachusetts post was made.


Governor:

Bob Massie seems like the strongest progressive candidate, though Jay Gonzalez’s platform is not bad either.


Lt. Governor:

Jimmy Tingle is running mate for Bob Massie and Quentin Palfrey is the running mate for Jay Gonzalez.


US Senator:

Elizabeth Warren is the only Democrat running. She is fairly progressive on many things, though many Berners were disappointed that she failed to endorse Bernie in 2016 and has been timid on supporting progressive legislation. The only other candidate running who seems to be progressive is Joshua Ford, though very little information is available about him online and I could only find his CrowdPAC page.


US Representatives:

MA-01: Tahirah Amatul-Wadud (Endorsed by Our Revolution)

MA-02: Incumbent Jim McGovern is quite progressive and a member of the Medicare-for-All Caucus

MA-03: Incumbent Niki Tsongas is not running for re-election. There are many Democratic candidates. I recommend voting for either Alexandra Chandler or Barbara L’Italien or possibly for Jeffrey Ballinger, though his website is a little less detailed. There is also a Justice Democrat candidate Juana Matias. Despite being endorsed by the Justice Democrats, I don’t think Juana’s platform is as strong as either Chandler or L’Italien. For instance, Juana says she would fight to “offer Medicare as a public option” to the ACA, while both Chandler and L’Italien are for Medicare-for-All. Matias also does not call for free college tuition, while the other candidates do.

MA-04: Gary Rucinski

MA-05: Incumbent Katherine Clark is very progressive and is a member of the Medicare-for-All Caucus

MA-06: Incumbent Seth Moulton is pretty conservative for a Democrat and a member of the neoliberal New Democrat Coalition. However, he does not have a progressive challenger. All the other candidates, Republican Joe Schneider, Veterans Party of America candidate Thomas Labo (no website) and independent Mary Charbonneau are also conservative, probably even more so than Moulton.

MA-07: Incumbent Michael Capuano is a strong progressive and member of the Medicare-for-All Caucus. Capuano in fact has supported Medicare-for-All for over a decade and is known for fighting fraud and abuse and for promoting peace over war. He is being challenged by Ayanna Pressley, who is a Justice Democrat Candidate. There is a great deal of overlap between the platforms of Capuano and Pressley and both support Medicare-for-All. There is some question though about Pressley’s commitment to a progressive agenda. This Intercept article says “Pressley is backed by major donors and powerful figures within the Democratic Party’s elite”, although as a Justice Democrat, she can’t accept any super PAC donations from such donors. A bit more worrying, is this part of the article that says “as Sanders stumped for universal health care and tuition-free college, Pressley declared at a Clinton campaign press conference in Boston that “plans without price tags are simply pandering.” The article goes on to say “Pressley said she hoped to emulate lawmakers such as Rep. Seth Moulton, a centrist member of the business-friendly New Democrats Coalition.”

MA-08: Incumbent Democrat Stephen Lynch is quite conservative for a Democrat. Brianna Wu is a much stronger progressive who supports Medicare-for-All and other progressive positions.

MA-09: Incumbent Bill Keating is another conservative Democrat. He is being challenged by a good progressive Bill Cimbrelo. Here is Cimbrelo’s platform, which includes Medicare-for-All, a Federal Jobs Guarantee, $ 15/hr minimum wage, free college tuition, etc.


Secretary of the Commonwealth: (this is analogous to Secretary of State)

Josh Zakin supports same day voter registration, automatic voter registration, weekend election days, no excuse absentee voting, ranked choice voting and election security (including risk limiting audits of the vote).


Here are some state-level races. I haven’t had time to research them, so people will need to research the candidates in their district. These links are to the list of candidates for each race.

Attorney General:

https://ballotpedia.org/Massachusetts_Attorney_General_election,_2018


Governor’s Council: (The council records advice and consent regarding gubernatorial appointments, warrants for the state treasury, and pardons and commutations.)

https://ballotpedia.org/Massachusetts_Governor%27s_Council_election,_2018


State Senate:

https://ballotpedia.org/Massachusetts_State_Senate_elections,_2018


State House:

https://ballotpedia.org/Massachusetts_House_of_Representatives_elections,_2018


These races will be on the November 6th ballot, but not on the primary ballot for September 4th. I’m listing them here, because I won’t have time to write about them on November 6th. You can read about them now and be prepared when the time comes.

Treasurer:

https://ballotpedia.org/Massachusetts_Treasurer_election,_2018


Auditor:

https://ballotpedia.org/Massachusetts_Auditor_election,_2018


State Ballot Measures:

https://ballotpedia.org/Massachusetts_2018_ballot_measures


Municipal

Suffolk County – https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Suffolk_County,_Massachusetts_(2018)


Finally, I may have missed some candidates, so if anyone else knows of a good progressive I’ve left off this list, let me know.

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Recommendations for progressive candidates in the primary in Florida (Primary August 28, but early voting ongoing now)

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Florida primary

Note that Florida has closed primaries, which means you need to registered in the party to vote for their candidates in the primary. There are a couple of exceptions though. All voters can vote in a particular election if (1) if all the candidates for an office have the same party affiliation and the winner of the primary election will not face any opposition in the general election or (2) if the race is non-partisan (as some downballot races are).

Below are candidates from our BKAS series that have progressive values. In general, the list contains candidates who have Bernie-like positions – Medicare-for-All, increased minimum wage, getting money out of politics, free college tuition, etc. However, not every candidate may support every position Bernie has. If you don’t know the candidate, check out their linked webpage. If you are not comfortable voting for any of these candidates, you can find others running in these races listed on the Green Papers or Ballotpedia for US Senate, Ballotpedia for US House or Ballotpedia for Governor. Also, here are links to the BKAS posts on Florida – Florida 1 and Florida 2, but note that they were written way back in mid-August of 2017 and candidates will have changed. Check the Green Papers or Ballotpedia links above for the most up-to-date list of candidates in your district. The list below includes candidates that have declared since those original Florida posts were made.


Governor:

Andrew Gillum (endorsed by Our Revolution and by Bernie Sanders). There is also a Green Party candidate Bruce Stanley

US Senator:

Incumbent Bill Nelson is the only Democratic candidate. If you don’t want to support Nelson, there is a write-in candidate who says he supports universal healthcare Michael Levinson, though he comes across as a little wacky. There is also a candidate of the Socialist Workers Party running as a write-in Steven Warshell, though virtually no information is available about him online.

US Representatives:

FL-01: There are two Democratic candidates, Jennifer Zimmerman and Phil Ehr, but neither comes across as very progressive.

FL-02: There are two Democratic candidates, Brandon Peters and Bob Rackleff, but neither comes across as particularly progressive.

FL-03: Tom Wells or Yvonne Hinson

FL-04: There is only one Democratic candidate, Ges Selmont, though he does not come across as particularly progressive. There are also a couple of independent candidates, Joceline Berrios and Jason Bulger, that seem lean Democratic, though neither mentions Medicare-for-All on their websites.

FL-05: There are two Democratic candidates, incumbent Al Lawson and Alvin Brown. Neither comes across as particularly progressive on their websites. This page comparing the two suggests Brown supports free college tuition and increasing the minimum wage to $ 15/hr, but neither of those positions is on his website, so…I’m not sure what he really supports.

FL-06: There are three Democratic candidates, Stephen Sevigny, Nancy Soderberg and John Upchurch. Upchurch says he wants to “expand Medicare to cover all Americans”. He also supports raising the cap on contributions to Social Security.

FL-07: Chardo Richardson (Justice Democrat and Brand New Congress Candidate)

FL-08: Sanjay Patel (Justice Democrat candidate and endorsed by Our Revolution)

FL-09: The incumbent Democrat Darren Soto is part of the Medicare-for-All caucus, although overall he’s fairly conservative for a Democrat. His primary challenger is Alan Grayson, who supports allowing people to buy into Medicare. Grayson also has a strong platform on getting money out of politics.

FL-10: There are two Democratic candidates, incumbent Val Demings, who is rather conservative for a Democrat, and Wade Darius. Darius supports Medicare-for-All, $ 15/hr minimum wage and free college tuition and other progressive stances.

FL-11: There is one Democratic candidate, Dana Cottrell, who seems to be conservative Democrat overall, but does support tuition-free college education. However, note she also talks about the “Galveston model” of Social Security, which is a privatized type of retirement plan. There is a write-in candidate who seems much more progressive Luis Saldana. He has quotes from Bernie on his website, including mentions of Medicare-for-All and free college tuition.

FL-12: Robert Tager supports Medicare-for-All or a public option to the ACA. Stephen Perenich supports regulating healthcare like a public utility to bring down costs. A third Democratic candidate, Chris Hunter, seems more conservative and only supports the ACA, but not anything further. There is also an independent, Angela Purkis, but her platform doesn’t really mention healthcare, but she does talk some about income inequality.

FL-13: No recommendation. The only Democrat is Charlie Crist, whose voting record is quite conservative for a Democrat.

FL-14: Kathy Castor. She is a somewhat moderate Democrat, but she is a member of the Medicare-for-All caucus.

FL-15: Raymond Pena Jr or write-in Green Party candidate Dave Johnson

FL-16: Jan Schneider.

FL-17: April Freeman also has some good stances such as fighting income inequality, supporting unions and collective bargaining, reforming Wall Street, etc. But she does not seem to support Medicare-for-All.

FL-18: Pam Keith (Justice Democrat candidate). She doesn’t mention Medicare-for-All on her website, but does on her Facebook page.

FL-19: Todd James Truax

FL-20: The incumbent Alcee Hastings supports Medicare-for-All and is a member of the Medicare-for-All caucus. His primary opponent, Sheila Cherfilus also supports Medicare-for-All and seems more progressive overall than Hastings.

FL-21: Lois Frankel is part of the Medicare-for-All caucus. She is unopposed.

FL-22: Jeff Fandl has his own plan to transition slowly to a Medicare-for-All type system. His other positions are progressive too, including free college tuition.

FL-23: Tim Canova. Note that Tim Canova is running as an independent, which means he will not be on the Democratic primary ballot where only Debbie Wasserman-Schultz will be listed. You will be able to vote for Canova in the November general election.

FL-24: The incumbent Frederica Wilson supports Medicare-for-All and is part of the Medicare-for-All caucus. She is being challenged by Ricardo De La Fuente, who does not support Medicare-for-All, but does address homelessness and affordable housing on his website. Note also that Ricardo De La Fuente is the son of Roque De La Fuente, a perennial candidate who is running as a Republican in multiple different states. I guess they figure that if the father doesn’t win, maybe the son will?

FL-25: Mary Barzee Flores is the only Democratic candidate. She says “I believe in medicare for all, but I think the road to get there has to be traveled in a way that insures more people along the way, not fewer”. Not sure exactly what she means by that, because if Medicare-for-All is implemented the way it has been proposed so far, there will not be a time with fewer people covered. Flores supports free community college and waiving tuition at 4 year colleges for “students who face economic barriers”.

FL-26: There are two Democrats running, Debbie Mucarsel-Powell and Demetries Grimes, but neither comes across as particularly progressive.

FL-27: Lots of candidates here support Medicare-for-All and other progressive positions, including Michael Hepburn (Justice Democrat and Brand New Congress Candidate), Matt Haggman, Kristen Gonzalez and David Richardson. Another candidate Donna Shalala says she would “create a “Medicare Option for All” by enhancing Medicare to better cover routine dental and vision, and long-term care, and make it available to anyone regardless of income, immigration status, or age. At the same time, preserve employer coverage as an option for those Americans satisfied with their current coverage.” This is not as good as the traditional Medicare-for-All plan supported by Bernie and other progressives. Therefore, I’d recommend that voters don’t choose Shalala.


Here are some state-level races. I mostly haven’t had time to research them (except for a few comments on them below), so people will need to research the candidates in their district. These links to candidates and issues for each race.


Secretary of State

Since 1998, when there were changes to the Florida constitution, the Secretary of State is not elected in Florida, but appointed by the Governor.


Attorney General

https://ballotpedia.org/Florida_Attorney_General_election,_2018

Note that both Democratic candidates seem decent, but Ryan Torrens specifically states that he would not defend the “Stand-your-ground” laws in Florida.


Chief Financial Officer:

https://ballotpedia.org/Florida_Chief_Financial_Officer_election,_2018


Agriculture Commissioner:

https://ballotpedia.org/Florida_Agriculture_Commissioner_election,_2018


State Senate

https://ballotpedia.org/Florida_State_Senate_elections,_2018


State House:

https://ballotpedia.org/Florida_House_of_Representatives_elections,_2018

Endorsed by Our Revolution:

District 66 – Alex Heeren

District 71 – Tracy Pratt


Supreme Court:

https://ballotpedia.org/Florida_Supreme_Court_elections,_2018


Appellate Courts:

https://ballotpedia.org/Florida_intermediate_appellate_court_elections,_2018


Local Judges:

https://ballotpedia.org/Florida_local_trial_court_judicial_elections,_2018


State ballot measures:

https://ballotpedia.org/Florida_2018_ballot_measures

Note ballot measure 5 requires that 2/3rds of the legislature is needed to impose new taxes or fees. This means that it will become very difficult to raise taxes in the future if the state needs more income and will force cuts in services during recessions. I would vote no on that one.

Ballot measure 12 prohibits public officials from lobbying for compensation while in office and for six years after leaving office. I think that is a good measure.


Local ballot measures:

https://ballotpedia.org/August_28,_2018_ballot_measures_in_Florida


School boards:

https://ballotpedia.org/Florida_school_board_elections,_2018


Municipal elections:

Hillsborough County – https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Hillsborough_County,_Florida_(2018)

Jacksonville – https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Jacksonville,_Florida_(2018)

Miami-Dade County – https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Miami-Dade_County,_Florida_(2018)

Orange County- https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Orange_County,_Florida_(2018)

Pinellas County – https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Pinellas_County,_Florida_(2018)


Finally, I may have missed some candidates, so if anyone else knows of a good progressive I’ve left off this list, let me know.

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Recommendations for Progressive Candidates in the Primary in Arizona (Primary on August 28, but early voting starting now)

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Arizona primary

Note that Arizona has primaries that are open to unaffiliated voters, which means that if you are registered with a party, you have to vote in their primary, but if you are not registered with any party, you can choose which primary to vote in.

Below are candidates from our BKAS series that have progressive values. In general, the list contains candidates who have Bernie-like positions – Medicare-for-All, increased minimum wage, getting money out of politics, free college tuition, etc. However, not every candidate may support every position Bernie has. If you don’t know the candidate, check out their linked webpage. If you are not comfortable voting for any of these candidates, you can find others running in these races listed on the Green Papers or Ballotpedia for US Senate, Ballotpedia for US House or Ballotpedia for Governor. Also, here is the link to the BKAS post on Arizona – Arizona , but note that it was written way back in early-August of 2017 and candidates have changed. Check the Green Papers or Ballotpedia links above for the most up-to-date list of candidates in your district. The list below includes candidates that have declared since those original Arizona posts were made.


Finally, I may have missed some candidates, so if anyone else knows of a good progressive I’ve left off this list, let me know.


Governor:

Kelly Fryer or David Garcia

US Senator:

Deedra Abboud (Justice Democrat Candidate). There is also a write-in Green Party candidate, Angela Green, though she describes herself as “a Democrat with a Republican background running as a Green Candidate” and also says “I want to be known as the Queen of Capitalism and make these Red and Blue states GREEN with money, organic farming and medicinal marijuana.” She doesn’t sound like a typical Green Party candidate and I question how committed she is to the Green Party agenda.

US Representatives:

AZ-01: Incumbent “Democrat” Tom O’Halleran is extremely conservative for a Democrat. Unfortunately, he does not have a Democratic challenger. The Republican candidates are also very conservative. There is a Libertarian running as a write-in candidate, Zhani Doko. There’s not a ton of information available about him, but he seems to have fairly typical Libertarian positions (free market, fewer regulations) and opposes US involvement in foreign wars.

AZ-02: There are lots of candidates that support Medicare-for-All and other progressive positions. I recommend one of these – Mary Matiella (Justice Democrat Candidate), Billy Kovacs, Barbara Sherry or Bruce Wheeler

AZ-03: Raul Grijalva (Justice Democrat Candidate)

AZ-04: Delina Disanto is the most progressive and supports Medicare-for-All. David Brill supports allowing people to buy into Medicare as a public option.

AZ-05: Joan Greene

AZ-06: Garrick McFadden

AZ-07: The incumbent Ruben Gallego is fairly progressive and signed on to support John Conyers Medicare-for-All bill (HR 676). However, note that he has not yet joined the Medicare-for-All Caucus in Congress, making me question his support… There is a Democratic primary challenger, Catherine Miranda, but she does not call for Medicare-for-All on her website. In addition, there is a write-in Green Party candidate, Gary Swing, though I’m not sure he’s a very serious candidate. I guess voters will have to decide who they prefer in this race.

AZ-08: The only Democrat running is Hiral Tipirneni, who supports allowing people to buy into Medicare as a public option, but does not support Medicare-for-All.

AZ-09: Current Mayor of Phoenix Greg Stanton is the only Democrat running. His website has no information on the policies he supports.


Secretary of State:

There is only one Democratic candidate, Katie Hobbs. She says that “she will act to end the outrageously long lines and crippling incompetence that are preventing Arizonans from participating in our elections”.


Attorney General:

There is one Democratic candidate January Contreras. She previously worked at the Department of Homeland Security under Janet Napolitano.


Other State Executive Offices:

State Superintendent for Public Instruction – David Schapira (endorsed by Our Revolution)


Also, here are Ballotpedia links for other State-level races. I haven’t had time to research these candidates, so you’ll have to do your own research on them.

State Senate:

https://ballotpedia.org/Arizona_State_Senate_elections,_2018

District 22 – Brianna Westbrook

District 29 – Martin Quezada

State House:

https://ballotpedia.org/Arizona_House_of_Representatives_elections,_2018

District 18 – LaDawn Stuben

District 24 – Marcus Ferrell

Supreme Court:

https://ballotpedia.org/Arizona_Supreme_Court_elections,_2018

Appellate Courts:

https://ballotpedia.org/Arizona_intermediate_appellate_court_elections,_2018

Local Judges:

https://ballotpedia.org/Arizona_local_trial_court_judicial_elections,_2018

State Ballot Measures:

https://ballotpedia.org/Arizona_2018_ballot_measures

Note that one of the four ballot measures would prohibit state and local governments from increasing taxes on services. This includes any kind of tax or fee. Services that are often taxed include things like hair salons, barbers, lawn care, cleaning services, etc. Now, no one wants to pay taxes, but by limiting the ability of locales to increase taxes when needed, you force cuts in government services. I’d argue that allowing state and local governments flexibility in taxing services is a good idea and I would vote “no” on this measure.

Local Ballot Measures:

https://ballotpedia.org/August_28,_2018_ballot_measures_in_Arizona

School Boards

https://ballotpedia.org/Arizona_school_board_elections,_2018

Municipal

Chandler – https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Chandler,_Arizona_(2018)

Gilbert – https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Gilbert,_Arizona_(2018)

Glendale – https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Glendale,_Arizona_(2018)

Maricopa County – https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Maricopa_County,_Arizona_(2018)

Mesa – https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Mesa,_Arizona_(2018)

Phoenix – https://ballotpedia.org/Mayoral_election_in_Phoenix,_Arizona_(2018)

Scottsdale – https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Scottsdale,_Arizona_(2018)


Finally, I may have missed some candidates, so if anyone else knows of a good progressive I’ve left off this list, let me know.

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Massachusetts Voting Highlights – Primary Registration Deadline: August 15, 2018

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Massachusetts Voting Highlights

Primary Registration Deadline: August 15, 2018

Primary: September 4, 2018 – 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.

General Election: November 6, 2018 – 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Register to Vote: https://www.sec.state.ma.us/OVR

Check your registration status: https://www.sec.state.ma.us/VoterRegistrationSearch/MyVoterRegStatus.aspx

Vote by mail: http://www.sec.state.ma.us/ele/eleabsentee/absidx.htm

Find your polling station: http://www.sec.state.ma.us/wheredoivotema/bal/MyElectionInfo.aspx

Bernie State Subreddit: /r/Massachusetts4Sanders

Our Revolution Endorsed Candidate:

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